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How Does The Universe End?

May 5, 2015

Have you ever wondered what will ultimately happen to the Earth, the sun, and our universe, long after we’re dead?  This video explains it all.

I’ll create a rough time-line for you all to follow.

– 600 million years from now

As the sun gets older, it will get hotter and hotter.  This temperature increase will be too much for plant life on Earth and most all biological life will go extinct.

– One billion years from now

The sun’s increased temperature will boil away all the oceans, leaving it a barren rock.  Only a few types of bacteria will survive, if anything.

– 2.8 billion years from now

Life will be completely impossible on Earth, even for straggler bacteria.

– 4 billion years from now

The Milky Way galaxy will collide with Andromeda, leading to a massive reshuffling of the stars.

– 5.4 billion years from now

Our sun will begin to run out of fuel

– 7.9 billion years from now

The sun will expand into a sphere 250 times larger than it is today; Mercury and Venus will be gobbled up in the process.

– 9.5 billion years from now

Our sun will deflate into a white dwarf star and become rather dim.

– 150 billion years from now

The universe will get so cold that even the cosmic background radiation becomes undetectable.  All distant galaxies will be invisible due to the universe’s expansion.

– One trillion years from now

Stars will no longer be forming in our galaxy.

– 110 trillion years from now

All stars will have burn out.  Everything will be lifeless, black, and cold.

– One quadrillion years from now

The cold, barren rock which we call Earth will plunge into the black dwarf which used to be our sun.

– 10^25 years from now

Our sun will becomes a black hole and slowly evaporate due to Hawking radiation.  Whatever tiny particles remain from this process will be slowly stretched out into nothingness as the space-time fabric continues to expand.

– 10^100 years from now

The universe will return into the nothingness from which it began.

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